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17 questions you should always ask yourself before accepting a new job

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17 questions you should always ask yourself before accepting a new job

When you’re on the hunt for a new job, you may feel compelled to jump at the first opportunity that comes your way.

But as Ryan Kahn, a career coach, founder of The Hired Group, and author of “Hired!

The Guide for the Recent Grad,” points out, by accepting the very first opportunity that presents itself, you may be leaving others — perhaps better ones — behind.

“Many candidates jump in feet first largely out of fear — especially fear that another opportunity may not come their way again,” explains Michael Kerr, an international business speaker and author of “You Can’t Be Serious! Putting Humour to Work.”

Kerr says he’s also seen people take jobs simply because of the effort they invested in the application and interviewing process.

“But a job is a serious, multi-year commitment,” Kahn says. “Before you say ‘yes,’ make sure you’ve done your homework and can feel confident in your decision.”

Here are 17 questions you should always ask yourself before accepting a new job:

Are the problems I have with my current company long-term or short-term?

If the problems are only short term, then so is the solution of hopping jobs. And Lou Adler, CEO of recruiter training and consulting firm The Adler Group, writes on Inc. that changing jobs every few years can be a real career killer in the end:

“Overall, too many candidates leave jobs for short-term problems and take new ones to obtain instant relief.

This job-hopping mentality leads to the vicious cycle of underperformance, dissatisfaction, and excessive turnover shown in the graphic.

Even career-motivated people can fall into this trap, being seduced by short-term promises, big bucks, and a nice title.”

Is this the kind of workplace culture in which I would thrive and be happy?

“Employers tend to stress the financial and obvious overt benefits of a job when they are hiring (think: salary, pension, and medical benefits), and it’s all too easy as a candidate to only focus on that — forgetting that survey after survey shows that other workplace factors have a far bigger impact on employees’ happiness levels,” Kerr explains.

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